Environmental Sustainability and Climate Change

Farmers are stewards of the land, committed to preserving resources for generations to come.

Canadian agriculture occupies a large and important part of the Canadian environment. The farm community is the chief steward and manager of extensive natural resources, owner and architect of much of the landscape and protector of a p recious soil resource. In its concern for the environmental fabric of Canada, CFA believes that great importance should be placed on measures of environmental management to ensure maintenance of land resources which provide food for the people of Canada and a large part of the world’s population.

There is a growing awareness in Canada of the relationship between agricultural production and environmental issues. Canadian farmers are aware of their responsibilities and are taking positive steps to ensure the environmental sustainability of their industry.

CFA recommendations:

Carbon pricing: Addressing competitiveness challenges

Canadian producers are concerned about maintaining competitiveness as they face the prospect of higher costs for inputs due to carbon pricing. While much of this action and policy making is being led at the provincial and territorial level, some issues such as policy consistency across provinces are of a federal interest. If producers are not compensated for or receive exemptions on crucial inputs such as diesel fuel, fertilizers, crop protection products and others, Canadian products will become less competitive internationally. Many of our competitors such as Australia and the U.S. have no plans to institute carbon pricing and most of Canada’s agricultural exports’ are priced globally.

For Canadian producers to remain competitive, it is absolutely crucial that revenues from carbon pricing are dedicated to funding producers for:

It’s vital to ensure producers can benefit from carbon pricing by receiving compensation through offset protocols for carbon sequestration, or significant reductions in nitrous oxide emissions. While agri-environmental conditions are different across Canada, incentives should be made available to all producers to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The greenhouse sector, which relies on CO2, requires close consideration in order to support ongoing production in Canada.

CFA recommendations:

Related reading:

Issue brief on Environment and Climate Change

CFA standing policy on Climate Change